decoarchitecture
decoarchitecture:

Brighton Park, Chicago, IllinoisPhoto by Debbie
Charming terra cotta detail.
From Flickr:

Brighton Park, Chicago 
Art Deco terra cotta, 4171 S. Archer. Julius Floto, architect. Floto was a civil and structural engineer as well as an architect. He had worked with Frank Lloyd Wright as a structural engineer on the Imperial Hotel (1915-1923), Wright’s best-known work in Japan and Tokyo’s premier hotel. Much of Floto’s work was done in the Chicago area. In Chicago, he was architect for the Oriental Institute at the University of Chicago (1931), remodeled Goodspeed Hall at the University of Chicago, converting a dormitory into the Art Department (1937), and co-designed the Meyercord Company Building (1938 later the William V. Banks Grand Lodge). He was the architect for the Hawthorne Race Course Clubhouse in Stickney (1924) and planned a one-story commercial building at 311-313 Madison Street in Oak Park (1928).

decoarchitecture:

Brighton Park, Chicago, Illinois
Photo by Debbie

Charming terra cotta detail.

From Flickr:

Brighton Park, Chicago 

Art Deco terra cotta, 4171 S. Archer. Julius Floto, architect. Floto was a civil and structural engineer as well as an architect. He had worked with Frank Lloyd Wright as a structural engineer on the Imperial Hotel (1915-1923), Wright’s best-known work in Japan and Tokyo’s premier hotel. Much of Floto’s work was done in the Chicago area. In Chicago, he was architect for the Oriental Institute at the University of Chicago (1931), remodeled Goodspeed Hall at the University of Chicago, converting a dormitory into the Art Department (1937), and co-designed the Meyercord Company Building (1938 later the William V. Banks Grand Lodge). He was the architect for the Hawthorne Race Course Clubhouse in Stickney (1924) and planned a one-story commercial building at 311-313 Madison Street in Oak Park (1928).

wellthatsjustgreat
And how hard is it to land even a minimum-wage job? This year, the Ivy League college admissions acceptance rate was 8.9%. Last year, when Walmart opened its first store in Washington, D.C., there were more than 23,000 applications for 600 jobs, which resulted in an acceptance rate of 2.6%, making the big box store about twice as selective as Harvard and five times as choosy as Cornell. Telling unemployed people to get off their couches (or out of the cars they live in or the shelters where they sleep) and get a job makes as much sense as telling them to go study at Harvard.